"zig-zag" to represent suppressed 0 on axis?

Hullo Matplotlib List,

I'm looking for a way to represent on an X-Y graph the fact that an axis does not start from the origin. When drawing by hand, I'll use a little zig-zag, lightning bolt, or slight space on the axis in question to represent this fact, just off from where the X and Y axis lines meet. How would I go about telling Matplotlib to do this? After two hours of perusing the Axes documentation, and tooling around in an IPython shell, I appear to be striking out.

If you are using a monospaced font to view this email, this may illustrate the functionality for which I'm looking:

  150 || * *
  145 || * *
  140 || * *
  135 || *
  130 ||
      /
       / <---- "zig zag" I want
      >>
    0 --------------------------------
       0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Many thanks for any help,

Kevin

2013/4/7 Kevin Hunter Kesling <kmhunte2@...4022...>

Hullo Matplotlib List,

I'm looking for a way to represent on an X-Y graph the fact that an axis
does not start from the origin. When drawing by hand, I'll use a little
zig-zag, lightning bolt, or slight space on the axis in question to
represent this fact, just off from where the X and Y axis lines meet.
How would I go about telling Matplotlib to do this? After two hours of
perusing the Axes documentation, and tooling around in an IPython shell,
I appear to be striking out.

If you are using a monospaced font to view this email, this may
illustrate the functionality for which I'm looking:

  150 || * *
  145 || * *
  140 || * *
  135 || *
  130 ||
      /
       / <---- "zig zag" I want
      >>
    0 --------------------------------
       0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Many thanks for any help,

Kevin

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Hi Kevin,

Have you given a look at this example:
http://matplotlib.org/examples/pylab_examples/broken_axis.html

Francesco

Damn, I clearly missed that one. And once I know what I'm looking for, my eye goes right to it. Sorry for the noise.

On the other hand, I'm still such a noob at Matplotlib ... is there a way to have one of the subplots take up more than its default 50% allotment?

Thanks,

Kevin

···

At 2:34pm -0400 Sun, 07 Apr 2013, Francesco Montesano wrote:

2013/4/7 Kevin Hunter Kesling

I'm looking for a way to represent on an X-Y graph the fact that an axis
does not start from the origin. When drawing by hand, I'll use a little
zig-zag, lightning bolt, or slight space on the axis in question to
represent this fact, just off from where the X and Y axis lines meet.
How would I go about telling Matplotlib to do this? After two hours of
perusing the Axes documentation, and tooling around in an IPython shell,
I appear to be striking out.

If you are using a monospaced font to view this email, this may
illustrate the functionality for which I'm looking:

   150 || * *
   145 || * *
   140 || * *
   135 || *
   130 ||
       /
        / <---- "zig zag" I want
       >>
     0 --------------------------------
        0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Have you given a look at this example:
http://matplotlib.org/examples/pylab_examples/broken_axis.html

hi Kevin,
you can give a look at the last two plots in this example http://matplotlib.org/examples/pylab_examples/demo_tight_layout.html or use plot.axes providing the rectangle that you want

fra

···

Il giorno 07/apr/2013 21:03, “Kevin Hunter Kesling” <kmhunte2@…4022…> ha scritto:

At 2:34pm -0400 Sun, 07 Apr 2013, Francesco Montesano wrote:

2013/4/7 Kevin Hunter Kesling

I’m looking for a way to represent on an X-Y graph the fact that an axis
does not start from the origin. When drawing by hand, I’ll use a little
zig-zag, lightning bolt, or slight space on the axis in question to
represent this fact, just off from where the X and Y axis lines meet.
How would I go about telling Matplotlib to do this? After two hours of
perusing the Axes documentation, and tooling around in an IPython shell,
I appear to be striking out.

If you are using a monospaced font to view this email, this may
illustrate the functionality for which I’m looking:

150 || * *
145 || * *
140 || * *
135 || *
130 ||
/
/ <---- “zig zag” I want
>>
0 --------------------------------
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Have you given a look at this example:
http://matplotlib.org/examples/pylab_examples/broken_axis.html

Damn, I clearly missed that one. And once I know what I’m looking for, my eye goes right to it. Sorry for the noise.

On the other hand, I’m still such a noob at Matplotlib … is there a way to have one of the subplots take up more than its default 50% allotment?

Thanks,

Kevin

That is closer to what I want, but still not there. I was finally able to find something that fit the bill to 95% of what I want:

http://matplotlib.1069221.n5.nabble.com/Proposal-for-Broken-Axes-td38050.html

The first post by 'klukas' does exactly what I asked for. It's a zig-zag on the Y-axis to show that what is graphed is not continuous, and unlike the various "official" examples, the zig-zag placement is user-specifiable, as opposed to exactly halfway between the top and bottom.

The only thing I have yet to figure out how to do is to simultaneously have a zig-zag on the X axis as well -- an artifact of how these zig-zags must be created via multiple axes on the same figure, rather than as built in to the axis artist.

For googleability:

The above linked graph code enables for matplotlib:

  - suppressed zeros on the Y-axis of an XY plot
  - showing suppressed data on the Y-axis
  - lightning bolt symbol on the Y-axis
  - zig-zag on the Y-axis
  - a "broken" Y-axis

Thanks for your pointers, Francesco, as they helped me to fine-tune my Google search terms. And thank you, Klukas, whoever you are.

Cheers,

Kevin

···

At 4:20pm -0400 Sun, 07 Apr 2013, Francesco Montesano wrote:

Il giorno 07/apr/2013 21:03, Kevin Hunter Kesling ha scritto:

On the other hand, I'm still such a noob at Matplotlib ... is there
a way to have one of the subplots take up more than its default 50%
allotment?

you can give a look at the last two plots in this example
http://matplotlib.org/examples/pylab_examples/demo_tight_layout.html or use
plot.axes providing the rectangle that you want

Hi Kevin,

I don’t check the link you provided very carefully. So I guess you already find a solution.

otherwise I have done something similar before and have made a bit general function to do

the job, which I think might be helpful for you.

You can check the following three functions at https://github.com/ChaoYue/pylsce/blob/master/g.py

Calc_Newaxes_Fraction
Axes_Replace_Split_Axes
Axes_Set_Breakaxis

a working example is below:

>>> fig,axs = plt.subplots(nrows=2)

>>> bottom_ax, top_ax = g.Axes_Replace_Split_Axes(fig,axs[0],split_fraction=[0.36,0.04,0.6],direction='v')

>>> g.Axes_Set_Breakaxis(bottom_ax, top_ax, 0.01,0.03,'v')

>>> left_ax, right_ax = g.Axes_Replace_Split_Axes(fig,axs[1],split_fraction=[0.38,0.02,0.6],direction='h')

>>> g.Axes_Set_Breakaxis(left_ax, right_ax, 0.03,0.02,'h')

the figure is as attached.

cheers,

chao

break_axis.jpg (182K) Download Attachment

···

On Mon, Apr 8, 2013 at 9:05 PM, Kevin Hunter [via matplotlib] <[hidden email]> wrote:

At 4:20pm -0400 Sun, 07 Apr 2013, Francesco Montesano wrote:

Il giorno 07/apr/2013 21:03, Kevin Hunter Kesling ha scritto:

On the other hand, I’m still such a noob at Matplotlib … is there

a way to have one of the subplots take up more than its default 50%

allotment?

you can give a look at the last two plots in this example

http://matplotlib.org/examples/pylab_examples/demo_tight_layout.html or use

plot.axes providing the rectangle that you want

That is closer to what I want, but still not there. I was finally able
to find something that fit the bill to 95% of what I want:

http://matplotlib.1069221.n5.nabble.com/Proposal-for-Broken-Axes-td38050.html

The first post by ‘klukas’ does exactly what I asked for. It’s a
zig-zag on the Y-axis to show that what is graphed is not continuous,
and unlike the various “official” examples, the zig-zag placement is
user-specifiable, as opposed to exactly halfway between the top and bottom.

The only thing I have yet to figure out how to do is to simultaneously
have a zig-zag on the X axis as well – an artifact of how these
zig-zags must be created via multiple axes on the same figure, rather
than as built in to the axis artist.

For googleability:

The above linked graph code enables for matplotlib:

  • suppressed zeros on the Y-axis of an XY plot

  • showing suppressed data on the Y-axis

  • lightning bolt symbol on the Y-axis

  • zig-zag on the Y-axis

  • a “broken” Y-axis

Thanks for your pointers, Francesco, as they helped me to fine-tune my
Google search terms. And thank you, Klukas, whoever you are.

Cheers,

Kevin


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On the other hand, I’m still such a noob at Matplotlib … is there
a way to have one of the subplots take up more than its default 50%
allotment?

you can give a look at the last two plots in this example
http://matplotlib.org/examples/pylab_examples/demo_tight_layout.html or use
plot.axes providing the rectangle that you want

That is closer to what I want, but still not there. I was finally able to find something that fit the bill to 95% of what I want:

http://matplotlib.1069221.n5.nabble.com/Proposal-for-Broken-Axes-td38050.html

The first post by ‘klukas’ does exactly what I asked for. It’s a zig-zag on the Y-axis to show that what is graphed is not continuous, and unlike the various “official” examples, the zig-zag placement is user-specifiable, as opposed to exactly halfway between the top and bottom.

The only thing I have yet to figure out how to do is to simultaneously have a zig-zag on the X axis as well – an artifact of how these zig-zags must be created via multiple axes on the same figure, rather than as built in to the axis artist.

For googleability:

The above linked graph code enables for matplotlib:

  • suppressed zeros on the Y-axis of an XY plot
  • showing suppressed data on the Y-axis
  • lightning bolt symbol on the Y-axis
  • zig-zag on the Y-axis
  • a “broken” Y-axis

Thanks for your pointers, Francesco, as they helped me to fine-tune my Google search terms. And thank you, Klukas, whoever you are.

I’m half that you found the solution for your problem and to have been useful just providing links. This has been one of the easiest answer I have ever given :slight_smile:

And mostly thanks for sharing your findings.

cheers and good night,
Fra

···

Il giorno 08/apr/2013 21:05, “Kevin Hunter Kesling” <kmhunte2@…4022…> ha scritto:

At 4:20pm -0400 Sun, 07 Apr 2013, Francesco Montesano wrote:

Il giorno 07/apr/2013 21:03, Kevin Hunter Kesling ha scritto:

Cheers,

Kevin