sharex with one figure aspect = 1.0

Hello list,

I want to axes above each other. They share the x-axis. The top figure has ‘aspect=1’ (it is a map), the bottom figure shows a cross-section along a horizontal line on the map, so it doesn’t have ‘aspect=1’. When I do this with code, for example like this:

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,sharex=True)

plt.setp(axes[0], aspect=1.0, adjustable=‘box-forced’)

then the physical size of the top axes is much sorter than the physical size of the bottom axes (although they are poperly linked, as they have the same data limit, and when zooming in the top figure, the bottom figure adjusts). It just looks weird, as the size of the horizontal axis of the bottom figure should have the same physical size as the horizontal axis of the top figure. This used to be possible (a few years ago; haven’t tried it for a while). Is there a way to do it with the current matpotlib? (1.4.3)

Thanks,

Mark

What are the data limits you are using?

I suspect they you are over constraining the system/order of operations issue. Try dropping the adjustable setting and pre setting both the data limits and the approximate size in figure fraction (ex via grid spec) of the axes.

Tom

···

On Tue, Apr 7, 2015, 15:54 Mark Bakker <markbak@…287…> wrote:

Hello list,

I want to axes above each other. They share the x-axis. The top figure has ‘aspect=1’ (it is a map), the bottom figure shows a cross-section along a horizontal line on the map, so it doesn’t have ‘aspect=1’. When I do this with code, for example like this:

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,sharex=True)

plt.setp(axes[0], aspect=1.0, adjustable=‘box-forced’)

then the physical size of the top axes is much sorter than the physical size of the bottom axes (although they are poperly linked, as they have the same data limit, and when zooming in the top figure, the bottom figure adjusts). It just looks weird, as the size of the horizontal axis of the bottom figure should have the same physical size as the horizontal axis of the top figure. This used to be possible (a few years ago; haven’t tried it for a while). Is there a way to do it with the current matpotlib? (1.4.3)

Thanks,

Mark


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Thanks, Thomas.

That works indeed, but it doesn’t make the figure adjustable, which is what I wanted (that the physical size of the axes changes while the aspect ratio is fixed to 1). I guess that functionality has been taken out.

Mark

···

On Wed, Apr 8, 2015 at 12:50 PM, Thomas Caswell <tcaswell@…287…> wrote:

What are the data limits you are using?

I suspect they you are over constraining the system/order of operations issue. Try dropping the adjustable setting and pre setting both the data limits and the approximate size in figure fraction (ex via grid spec) of the axes.

Tom

On Tue, Apr 7, 2015, 15:54 Mark Bakker <markbak@…287…> wrote:

Hello list,

I want to axes above each other. They share the x-axis. The top figure has ‘aspect=1’ (it is a map), the bottom figure shows a cross-section along a horizontal line on the map, so it doesn’t have ‘aspect=1’. When I do this with code, for example like this:

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,sharex=True)

plt.setp(axes[0], aspect=1.0, adjustable=‘box-forced’)

then the physical size of the top axes is much sorter than the physical size of the bottom axes (although they are poperly linked, as they have the same data limit, and when zooming in the top figure, the bottom figure adjusts). It just looks weird, as the size of the horizontal axis of the bottom figure should have the same physical size as the horizontal axis of the top figure. This used to be possible (a few years ago; haven’t tried it for a while). Is there a way to do it with the current matpotlib? (1.4.3)

Thanks,

Mark


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Can you please provide a minimal, but complete and runnable example of what you are doing?

···

On Wed, Apr 8, 2015 at 12:50 PM, Thomas Caswell <tcaswell@…287…> wrote:

What are the data limits you are using?

I suspect they you are over constraining the system/order of operations issue. Try dropping the adjustable setting and pre setting both the data limits and the approximate size in figure fraction (ex via grid spec) of the axes.

Tom

On Tue, Apr 7, 2015, 15:54 Mark Bakker <markbak@…287…> wrote:

Hello list,

I want to axes above each other. They share the x-axis. The top figure has ‘aspect=1’ (it is a map), the bottom figure shows a cross-section along a horizontal line on the map, so it doesn’t have ‘aspect=1’. When I do this with code, for example like this:

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,sharex=True)

plt.setp(axes[0], aspect=1.0, adjustable=‘box-forced’)

then the physical size of the top axes is much sorter than the physical size of the bottom axes (although they are poperly linked, as they have the same data limit, and when zooming in the top figure, the bottom figure adjusts). It just looks weird, as the size of the horizontal axis of the bottom figure should have the same physical size as the horizontal axis of the top figure. This used to be possible (a few years ago; haven’t tried it for a while). Is there a way to do it with the current matpotlib? (1.4.3)

Thanks,

Mark


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import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

%matplotlib qt

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,sharex=True)

plt.setp(axes[0], aspect=1.0, adjustable=‘box-forced’)

plt.show()

This used to create two axes of the same horizontal size. What it does now is that it scales the upper axis so that the aspect=1.0 by changing the physical size of the axis. But the physical size of the lower axis is not changed, while this used to be the case in the past (but that may have been a few years back). That sure used to be the desired behavior.

Thanks for your help,

Mark

···

On Wed, Apr 8, 2015 at 2:16 PM, Thomas Caswell <tcaswell@…287…> wrote:

Can you please provide a minimal, but complete and runnable example of what you are doing?

On Wed, Apr 8, 2015, 08:13 Mark Bakker <markbak@…1896…> wrote:

Thanks, Thomas.

That works indeed, but it doesn’t make the figure adjustable, which is what I wanted (that the physical size of the axes changes while the aspect ratio is fixed to 1). I guess that functionality has been taken out.

Mark

On Wed, Apr 8, 2015 at 12:50 PM, Thomas Caswell <tcaswell@…287…> wrote:

What are the data limits you are using?

I suspect they you are over constraining the system/order of operations issue. Try dropping the adjustable setting and pre setting both the data limits and the approximate size in figure fraction (ex via grid spec) of the axes.

Tom

On Tue, Apr 7, 2015, 15:54 Mark Bakker <markbak@…287…> wrote:

Hello list,

I want to axes above each other. They share the x-axis. The top figure has ‘aspect=1’ (it is a map), the bottom figure shows a cross-section along a horizontal line on the map, so it doesn’t have ‘aspect=1’. When I do this with code, for example like this:

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,sharex=True)

plt.setp(axes[0], aspect=1.0, adjustable=‘box-forced’)

then the physical size of the top axes is much sorter than the physical size of the bottom axes (although they are poperly linked, as they have the same data limit, and when zooming in the top figure, the bottom figure adjusts). It just looks weird, as the size of the horizontal axis of the bottom figure should have the same physical size as the horizontal axis of the top figure. This used to be possible (a few years ago; haven’t tried it for a while). Is there a way to do it with the current matpotlib? (1.4.3)

Thanks,

Mark


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What version had this behavior? I recall some work on how aspect worked, but not exactly what we did. I see why it is useful, but on the other hand that sort of coupling seems like could cause some trouble if we are not careful. This all come back to we need a real layout manager/constraint solver (which no one has yet had time to address).

For now I think this will do what you want:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from mpl_toolkits.axes_grid1 import make_axes_locatable

fig, ax_top = plt.subplots()
ax_top.set_aspect(1)
divider = make_axes_locatable(ax_top)
bax_bottom = divider.append_axes(‘bottom’, 1, pad=0.1,
sharex=ax_top)

Please don’t use plt.setp, it is a MATLABism that I think is past it’s time.

···

On Wed, Apr 8, 2015 at 2:16 PM, Thomas Caswell <tcaswell@…287…> wrote:

Can you please provide a minimal, but complete and runnable example of what you are doing?

On Wed, Apr 8, 2015, 08:13 Mark Bakker <markbak@…1896…> wrote:

Thanks, Thomas.

That works indeed, but it doesn’t make the figure adjustable, which is what I wanted (that the physical size of the axes changes while the aspect ratio is fixed to 1). I guess that functionality has been taken out.

Mark

On Wed, Apr 8, 2015 at 12:50 PM, Thomas Caswell <tcaswell@…287…> wrote:

What are the data limits you are using?

I suspect they you are over constraining the system/order of operations issue. Try dropping the adjustable setting and pre setting both the data limits and the approximate size in figure fraction (ex via grid spec) of the axes.

Tom

On Tue, Apr 7, 2015, 15:54 Mark Bakker <markbak@…287…> wrote:

Hello list,

I want to axes above each other. They share the x-axis. The top figure has ‘aspect=1’ (it is a map), the bottom figure shows a cross-section along a horizontal line on the map, so it doesn’t have ‘aspect=1’. When I do this with code, for example like this:

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,sharex=True)

plt.setp(axes[0], aspect=1.0, adjustable=‘box-forced’)

then the physical size of the top axes is much sorter than the physical size of the bottom axes (although they are poperly linked, as they have the same data limit, and when zooming in the top figure, the bottom figure adjusts). It just looks weird, as the size of the horizontal axis of the bottom figure should have the same physical size as the horizontal axis of the top figure. This used to be possible (a few years ago; haven’t tried it for a while). Is there a way to do it with the current matpotlib? (1.4.3)

Thanks,

Mark


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Following up on this, I’d like to complain about set_aspect()…

If I do:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,sharex=True)

axes[0].set_ylim(0,1.)

axes[0].set_aspect(1.)

plt.show()

the x-axis goes from 0. to 1., but axes[0]’s y-axis goes from 0.32 to 0.67. Swapping the order of the y_lim call doesn’t help. This is very un-intuitive, as I’d expect set_ylim() to set what data I see no matter what else is happening w/ the plot.

I see that

axes[0].set_aspect(1.,adjustable=‘box-forced’)

will give the desired behaviour, but I really think it should be the default, not adjustable=‘datalim’. I had no idea set_aspect() had this parameter until today, and have had several cursing matches with set_aspect as it kept changing my explicitly set data limits. set_ylim() should set the y limits.

Just my opinion. Maybe there is a reason for the default, but I really think the data view should be prioritized over the shape of the axis.

Thanks, Jody

···

On Wed, Apr 8, 2015 at 2:16 PM, Thomas Caswell <tcaswell@…287…> wrote:

Can you please provide a minimal, but complete and runnable example of what you are doing?

On Wed, Apr 8, 2015, 08:13 Mark Bakker <markbak@…287…> wrote:

Thanks, Thomas.

That works indeed, but it doesn’t make the figure adjustable, which is what I wanted (that the physical size of the axes changes while the aspect ratio is fixed to 1). I guess that functionality has been taken out.

Mark

On Wed, Apr 8, 2015 at 12:50 PM, Thomas Caswell <tcaswell@…287…> wrote:

What are the data limits you are using?

I suspect they you are over constraining the system/order of operations issue. Try dropping the adjustable setting and pre setting both the data limits and the approximate size in figure fraction (ex via grid spec) of the axes.

Tom

On Tue, Apr 7, 2015, 15:54 Mark Bakker <markbak@…287…> wrote:

Hello list,

I want to axes above each other. They share the x-axis. The top figure has ‘aspect=1’ (it is a map), the bottom figure shows a cross-section along a horizontal line on the map, so it doesn’t have ‘aspect=1’. When I do this with code, for example like this:

fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,sharex=True)

plt.setp(axes[0], aspect=1.0, adjustable=‘box-forced’)

then the physical size of the top axes is much sorter than the physical size of the bottom axes (although they are poperly linked, as they have the same data limit, and when zooming in the top figure, the bottom figure adjusts). It just looks weird, as the size of the horizontal axis of the bottom figure should have the same physical size as the horizontal axis of the top figure. This used to be possible (a few years ago; haven’t tried it for a while). Is there a way to do it with the current matpotlib? (1.4.3)

Thanks,

Mark


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Following up on this, I�d like to complain about set_aspect()�

If I do:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,sharex=True)
axes[0].set_ylim(0,1.)
axes[0].set_aspect(1.)
plt.show()

the x-axis goes from 0. to 1., but axes[0]�s y-axis goes from 0.32 to
0.67. Swapping the order of the y_lim call doesn�t help. This is very
un-intuitive, as I�d expect set_ylim() to set what data I see no matter
what else is happening w/ the plot.

I see that
axes[0].set_aspect(1.,adjustable=�box-forced�)
will give the desired behaviour, but I really think it should be the
default, not adjustable=�datalim'. I had no idea set_aspect() had this
parameter until today, and have had several cursing matches with
set_aspect as it kept changing my explicitly set data limits. set_ylim()
should set the y limits.

Just my opinion. Maybe there is a reason for the default, but I really
think the data view should be prioritized over the shape of the axis.

Jody,

I'm the guilty party for most of how set_aspect works. I developed it a long time ago. Yes, there was a reason--still is, I'm 99% sure--but I don't remember everything, and don't want to take the time now to reconstruct the whole rationale. When I was developing the behavior, I was paying a lot of attention to what happens under various scenarios of resizing and reshaping the window, and turning options on and off. There are some basic conflicts that arise when shared axes are combined with fixed aspect ratios, autoscaling, and gui-driven reshaping. Sometimes 'box-forced' does what people want, maybe more often than not; but I'm pretty sure it can lead to trouble, which is the reason it is not the default.

Eric

···

On 2015/04/08 7:04 AM, Jody Klymak wrote:

Thanks, Jody

I forgot to include: I was trying to make everything sane (and reversible) under zoom and pan as well as reshaping and resizing.

···

On 2015/04/08 7:04 AM, Jody Klymak wrote:

Maybe there is a reason for the default, but I really think the data
view should be prioritized over the shape of the axis.

Hi Eric,

I'm the guilty party for most of how set_aspect works. I developed it a
long time ago. Yes, there was a reason--still is, I'm 99% sure--but I
don't remember everything, and don't want to take the time now to
reconstruct the whole rationale. When I was developing the behavior, I
was paying a lot of attention to what happens under various scenarios of
resizing and reshaping the window, and turning options on and off.
There are some basic conflicts that arise when shared axes are combined
with fixed aspect ratios, autoscaling, and gui-driven reshaping.
Sometimes 'box-forced' does what people want, maybe more often than not;
but I'm pretty sure it can lead to trouble, which is the reason it is
not the default.

OK, first my apologies:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2)
axes[0].set_aspect(1.)
axes[0].plot(np.arange(10),np.arange(10))
axes[0].set_ylim([0,24])
axes[0].set_xlim([0,12])
axes[1].plot(np.arange(10),np.arange(10)*2.)
plt.show()

Works as I'd expect. axes[0] gets shrunk in the x dimension to make the aspect ratio 1.

However:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,sharex=True)
axes[0].set_aspect(1.)
axes[0].plot(np.arange(10),np.arange(10))
axes[0].set_ylim([0,24])
axes[0].set_xlim([0,12])
axes[1].plot(np.arange(10),np.arange(10)*2.)
plt.show()

does not work as I'd expect. axes[0]'s ylim gets changed so that the line is no longer viewable (= 10-14). In my opinion, the two calls should work the same, except in the second case, axes[1]'s xlim should be 0-12.

Even worse, if I use the same aspect ratio in axes[1], they *both* do not show all the data:

axes[0].set_aspect(1.)

It appears here that with sharex=True the shape of the axis no longer becomes mutable when set_aspect() is used, whereas if sharex=False set_aspect() can change the axis shape. I don't see any reason for sharex to foist this behaviour onto set_aspect().

I guess the workaround is don't use sharex=True, but I actually think this is a bug.

Thanks, Jody

···

On 8 Apr 2015, at 11:02 AM, Eric Firing <efiring@...202...> wrote:

--
Jody Klymak
http://web.uvic.ca/~jklymak/

Hi Eric,

I'm the guilty party for most of how set_aspect works. I developed it a
long time ago. Yes, there was a reason--still is, I'm 99% sure--but I
don't remember everything, and don't want to take the time now to
reconstruct the whole rationale. When I was developing the behavior, I
was paying a lot of attention to what happens under various scenarios of
resizing and reshaping the window, and turning options on and off.
There are some basic conflicts that arise when shared axes are combined
with fixed aspect ratios, autoscaling, and gui-driven reshaping.
Sometimes 'box-forced' does what people want, maybe more often than not;
but I'm pretty sure it can lead to trouble, which is the reason it is
not the default.

OK, first my apologies:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2)
axes[0].set_aspect(1.)
axes[0].plot(np.arange(10),np.arange(10))
axes[0].set_ylim([0,24])
axes[0].set_xlim([0,12])
axes[1].plot(np.arange(10),np.arange(10)*2.)
plt.show()

Works as I'd expect. axes[0] gets shrunk in the x dimension to make the aspect ratio 1.

However:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
fig, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,sharex=True)
axes[0].set_aspect(1.)
axes[0].plot(np.arange(10),np.arange(10))
axes[0].set_ylim([0,24])
axes[0].set_xlim([0,12])
axes[1].plot(np.arange(10),np.arange(10)*2.)
plt.show()

does not work as I'd expect. axes[0]'s ylim gets changed so that the line is no longer viewable (= 10-14). In my opinion, the two calls should work the same, except in the second case, axes[1]'s xlim should be 0-12.

If you leave out the set_ylim call, it works. Given that you have specified set_ylim[0, 24], how is mpl supposed to know what ylim range you really want, when the axis constraint means it can only plot a small part of the specified range? Basically, you have set up conflicting constraints, and mpl failed to resolve the conflict the way you think it should have. Maybe that could be improved, but I warn you, it's a tricky business. Squeeze in one place and things pop out somewhere else.

Eric

···

On 2015/04/08 8:43 AM, Jody Klymak wrote:

On 8 Apr 2015, at 11:02 AM, Eric Firing <efiring@...202...> wrote:

Even worse, if I use the same aspect ratio in axes[1], they *both* do not show all the data:

axes[0].set_aspect(1.)

It appears here that with sharex=True the shape of the axis no longer becomes mutable when set_aspect() is used, whereas if sharex=False set_aspect() can change the axis shape. I don't see any reason for sharex to foist this behaviour onto set_aspect().

I guess the workaround is don't use sharex=True, but I actually think this is a bug.

Thanks, Jody

--
Jody Klymak
http://web.uvic.ca/~jklymak/