making subplots with rows different sizes

Hi,

I want to make a figure that has three subplots. The top one should
be a big, mostly square thing. The bottom two should be rectangular
things. That is, I want it to look like this:

XXXXX

XXXXX

XXXXX

so, I'm using subplot(311), subplot(312), subplot(313). But, things
are getting resized so that each of the rows has the same height.
That really messes up the aspect ratio for my top row.

I tried axis('equal') and axis('scaled') after making the first
subplot. I do indeed get a good aspect ratio, but it shrinks things
to do this, rather than stretching things. I'd really like the top
row to be taller than the bottom rows. How can I do this?

If it matters, I make the top box with pcolormesh and the bottom
rectangles with plot.

Thank you,

-michael

···

--
Biophysics Graduate Student
Carlson Lab, University of Michigan
http://www.umich.edu/~mlerner http://lernerclan.net

Hi Michael,

···

On 21 March 2007, Michael Lerner wrote:

so, I'm using subplot(311), subplot(312), subplot(313). But, things
are getting resized so that each of the rows has the same height.
That really messes up the aspect ratio for my top row.

I tried axis('equal') and axis('scaled') after making the first
subplot. I do indeed get a good aspect ratio, but it shrinks things
to do this, rather than stretching things. I'd really like the top
row to be taller than the bottom rows. How can I do this?

See the examples.

You just have to set figure size you need.

f = Figure(figsize=(5,4), dpi=100)

--
Zack

Hi,

Sorry if I'm just being thick .. I read through several of the
examples, and didn't figure it out. I can figure out how to use
figsize to set the size of the entire figure, but I want several
subplots on one figure. Maybe you can help me fix some sample code.
This plots a matrix and sqrt(x)/2. I'd like to have the matrix show
up as a square while sqrt(x)/2 shows up as a rectangle. The call to
axis('scaled') makes my matrix show up as square, but I'd like it to
be stretched out so that it uses up all of the horizontal space and
makes the figure taller. That is, I want row 1 to be taller than row
2.

Thanks,

-Michael

#!/usr/bin/env python

from pylab import *
subplot(211)
mat = array([[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]])
pcolormesh(mat)
axis('scaled')

subplot(212)
dt = 0.001
t = arange(0.0, 10.0, dt)
root_t_over_2 = (t/2.0)**0.5
plot(t,root_t_over_2)

show()

···

On 3/21/07, Zack <zack24@...287...> wrote:

Hi Michael,

On 21 March 2007, Michael Lerner wrote:

> so, I'm using subplot(311), subplot(312), subplot(313). But, things
> are getting resized so that each of the rows has the same height.
> That really messes up the aspect ratio for my top row.
>
> I tried axis('equal') and axis('scaled') after making the first
> subplot. I do indeed get a good aspect ratio, but it shrinks things
> to do this, rather than stretching things. I'd really like the top
> row to be taller than the bottom rows. How can I do this?

See the examples.

You just have to set figure size you need.

f = Figure(figsize=(5,4), dpi=100)

--
Zack

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--
Biophysics Graduate Student
Carlson Lab, University of Michigan
http://www.umich.edu/~mlerner http://lernerclan.net

The following might hrlp:

ax1 = subplot(211)
ax2 = subplot(413)
ax3 = subplot(414)

JDH

···

On 3/21/07, Michael Lerner <mglerner@...287...> wrote:

Hi,

I want to make a figure that has three subplots. The top one should
be a big, mostly square thing. The bottom two should be rectangular
things. That is, I want it to look like this:

XXXXX

XXXXX

XXXXX

so, I'm using subplot(311), subplot(312), subplot(313). But, things
are getting resized so that each of the rows has the same height.
That really messes up the aspect ratio for my top row.

John Hunter wrote:

Hi,

I want to make a figure that has three subplots. The top one should
be a big, mostly square thing. The bottom two should be rectangular
things. That is, I want it to look like this:

XXXXX

XXXXX

XXXXX

so, I'm using subplot(311), subplot(312), subplot(313). But, things
are getting resized so that each of the rows has the same height.
That really messes up the aspect ratio for my top row.

The following might hrlp:

ax1 = subplot(211)
ax2 = subplot(413)
ax3 = subplot(414)

JDH

And if you want to tweak the positions you can use, e.g., oldpos = ax1.get_position() to find out the present position, and ax1.set_position(newpos) to change it. The position rectangles are [left, bottom, width, height] in relative coordinates--that is, fractions of the figure width and height.

If you want to control the aspect ratio of the data without changing the position rectangle (e.g. after adjusting it as above), use
ax1.set_aspect(aspect, adjustable='datalim').

Eric

···

On 3/21/07, Michael Lerner <mglerner@...287...> wrote:

I recently attended a fantastic workshop by John Hunter and Fernando
Perez, and John pointed out that I really do want to play with the
axis objects directly. In case someone googles for this later on,
here's how to do it for two boxes:

ax = axes([0.1, 0.3, 0.8, 0.6])
plot(rand(12))

a2 = axes([0.1, 0.1, 0.8, 0.15])
plot(rand(12))

···

On 3/21/07, Eric Firing <efiring@...202...> wrote:

John Hunter wrote:
> On 3/21/07, Michael Lerner <mglerner@...287...> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> I want to make a figure that has three subplots. The top one should
>> be a big, mostly square thing. The bottom two should be rectangular
>> things. That is, I want it to look like this:
>>
>> XXXXX
>>
>> XXXXX
>>
>> XXXXX
>>
>> so, I'm using subplot(311), subplot(312), subplot(313). But, things
>> are getting resized so that each of the rows has the same height.
>> That really messes up the aspect ratio for my top row.
>
> The following might hrlp:
>
> ax1 = subplot(211)
> ax2 = subplot(413)
> ax3 = subplot(414)
>
> JDH

And if you want to tweak the positions you can use, e.g., oldpos =
ax1.get_position() to find out the present position, and
ax1.set_position(newpos) to change it. The position rectangles are
[left, bottom, width, height] in relative coordinates--that is,
fractions of the figure width and height.

If you want to control the aspect ratio of the data without changing the
position rectangle (e.g. after adjusting it as above), use
ax1.set_aspect(aspect, adjustable='datalim').

Eric

--
Biophysics Graduate Student
Carlson Lab, University of Michigan
http://www.umich.edu/~mlerner http://lernerclan.net