Make the area a bit larger

So since I wanted some space on the borders of my graph, I did this
really extremely convoluted thing, which apparently works...
I get a 10% more area on each side, but I'm quite sure there's a better
way to this, right?

I didn't find any function to pass an increment to the size that's why I
did this mess...

--8<---------------cut here---------------start------------->8---
        old_axes = plt.axis()
        sizes = old_axes[1] - old_axes[0], old_axes[3] - old_axes[2]
        offset = lambda x: int((float(x) / 10))
        new_axes = []

        for i in range(len(old_axes)):
            new_val = old_axes[i] + (((-1) ** (i + 1)) * offset(sizes[i % 2]))
            new_axes.append(new_val)

        plt.axis(new_axes)
--8<---------------cut here---------------end--------------->8---

Hi,

You can try:

fig, ax = plt.subplots(1,1)
ax.plot(range(10))

fig.subplots_adjust(left=0.05, right=0.95, bottom=0.05, top=0.95)

If you choose WXAgg as your backend you get a nice config tool to adjust spacing in the figure. Then just pass those numbers into .subplots_adjust method once you are satisfied.

···

On Mon, Feb 28, 2011 at 10:48 AM, Andrea Crotti <andrea.crotti.0@…287…> wrote:

So since I wanted some space on the borders of my graph, I did this

really extremely convoluted thing, which apparently works…

I get a 10% more area on each side, but I’m quite sure there’s a better

way to this, right?

I didn’t find any function to pass an increment to the size that’s why I

did this mess…

–8<---------------cut here---------------start------------->8—

    old_axes = plt.axis()

    sizes = old_axes[1] - old_axes[0], old_axes[3] - old_axes[2]

    offset = lambda x: int((float(x) / 10))

    new_axes = []



    for i in range(len(old_axes)):

        new_val = old_axes[i] + (((-1) ** (i + 1)) * offset(sizes[i % 2]))

        new_axes.append(new_val)



    plt.axis(new_axes)

–8<---------------cut here---------------end--------------->8—


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Gökhan

Gökhan Sever, on 2011-02-28 11:32, wrote:

> So since I wanted some space on the borders of my graph, I did this
> really extremely convoluted thing, which apparently works...
> I get a 10% more area on each side, but I'm quite sure there's a better
> way to this, right?
>
> I didn't find any function to pass an increment to the size that's why I
> did this mess...
>
> --8<---------------cut here---------------start------------->8---
> old_axes = plt.axis()
> sizes = old_axes[1] - old_axes[0], old_axes[3] - old_axes[2]
> offset = lambda x: int((float(x) / 10))
> new_axes = []
>
> for i in range(len(old_axes)):
> new_val = old_axes[i] + (((-1) ** (i + 1)) * offset(sizes[i %
> 2]))
> new_axes.append(new_val)
>
> plt.axis(new_axes)
> --8<---------------cut here---------------end--------------->8---

You can try:

fig, ax = plt.subplots(1,1)
ax.plot(range(10))
fig.subplots_adjust(left=0.05, right=0.95, bottom=0.05, top=0.95)

Hi Andrea,

I think Gökhan is pointing out a different feature than the one
you want. You seem to want to adjust the x and y limits of the
plot to be some fraction larger than the data that's plotted.

You can do this with:

ax = plt.subplot(111)
ax.plot(range(10))
ax.set_ymargin(.2)
ax.set_xmargin(.1)
# or ax.margins(.1,.2)
ax.autoscale()
plt.draw()

see also the docstring for ax.autoscale_view for more.

best,

···

On Mon, Feb 28, 2011 at 10:48 AM, Andrea Crotti > <andrea.crotti.0@...287...>wrote:

--
Paul Ivanov
314 address only used for lists, off-list direct email at:
http://pirsquared.org | GPG/PGP key id: 0x0F3E28F7

Gökhan Sever <gokhansever@...287...> writes:

Hi,

You can try:

fig, ax = plt.subplots(1,1)
ax.plot(range(10))
fig.subplots_adjust(left=0.05, right=0.95, bottom=0.05, top=0.95)

If you choose WXAgg as your backend you get a nice config tool to adjust
spacing in the figure. Then just pass those numbers into .subplots_adjust
method once you are satisfied.

Uhm strange, with the version of matplotlib that I have know I have
subplots_adjust, but I don't have plt.subplots, was it added later?
Well I can also leave my very convoluted way for now, I'll see later
what to do...

Paul Ivanov <pivanov314@...287...> writes:

Hi Andrea,

I think Gökhan is pointing out a different feature than the one
you want. You seem to want to adjust the x and y limits of the
plot to be some fraction larger than the data that's plotted.

You can do this with:

ax = plt.subplot(111)
ax.plot(range(10))
ax.set_ymargin(.2)
ax.set_xmargin(.1)
# or ax.margins(.1,.2)
ax.autoscale()
plt.draw()

see also the docstring for ax.autoscale_view for more.

best,

Uhm also autoscale and set_xmargin are not implemented in my version of
matplotlib, too bad I'll just keep my hack for now...