GSoC: TeX rendering engine

Hi all,

Sorry it has taken me so long to get back to you all however I am in the middle of exam season and so time is scarce.

For the most part the (current) code is agnostic with regards to the rendering backend. The only real functionality required is the ability to draw lines and plot glyphs (which includes getting extents). As a result there currently exists support for many backends. I see no reason why a production-ready version of the library will not provide the same.

However, my primary focus will be on Cairo and Qt backends. These are widely used, allow for high quality output in various formats (PDF, PNG and SVG being the big three) and are well tested.

The lack of a C++/C library should not be a major issue. Python is very well established in the fields that the library is likely to be of most use (web, graphing, visualisation) and where it isn't there will most certainly be a command-line tool

Regards, Freddie.

PGP.sig (194 Bytes)

However, my primary focus will be on Cairo and Qt backends. These are
widely used, allow for high quality output in various formats (PDF,
PNG and SVG being the big three) and are well tested.

Ok, that sounds reasonable.

The lack of a C++/C library should not be a major issue. Python is
very well established in the fields that the library is likely to be
of most use (web, graphing, visualisation)

I mentioned C++/C because I am interested in using it in my computer
algebra system (http://www.aei.mpg.de/~peekas/cadabra), and its user
interface is currently written in C++ using gtkmm. C++ is fairly
widely spread in the scientific community too, in some fields much
more than Python.

Since the user base for a TeX typesetting library isn't particularly
large (compared to other libraries), it's probably good to at least
keep in mind that people might want to call this from a non-Python
language (even though I will probably be tempted to convert my code to
Python). In any case, having a Cairo backend will help.

Cheers,
Kasper

Freddie Witherden wrote:

However, my primary focus will be on Cairo and Qt backends. These are widely used, allow for high quality output in various formats (PDF, PNG and SVG being the big three) and are well tested.

It would also be great to pull in the pure-Python PDF and SVG code from matplotlib so that no C GUI libraries would be required.

The lack of a C++/C library should not be a major issue. Python is very well established in the fields that the library is likely to be of most use (web, graphing, visualisation) and where it isn't there will most certainly be a command-line tool

Cheers,
Mike

···

--
Michael Droettboom
Science Software Branch
Operations and Engineering Division
Space Telescope Science Institute
Operated by AURA for NASA

C++ and Python versions would be great.

Christophe

Michael Droettboom a écrit :

···

Freddie Witherden wrote:
  

However, my primary focus will be on Cairo and Qt backends. These are widely used, allow for high quality output in various formats (PDF, PNG and SVG being the big three) and are well tested.
    

It would also be great to pull in the pure-Python PDF and SVG code from matplotlib so that no C GUI libraries would be required.

If it becomes easy to have formulas with Python then it would be used. That's sure. You can't say that C++ is better. I prefer Python, you work with C++, so why only a C++ version rather than a Python one ?

Christophe.

Kasper Peeters a écrit :

···

Since the user base for a TeX typesetting library isn't particularly
large (compared to other libraries), it's probably good to at least
keep in mind that people might want to call this from a non-Python
language (even though I will probably be tempted to convert my code to
Python). In any case, having a Cairo backend will help.

If it becomes easy to have formulas with Python then it would be used.
That's sure. You can't say that C++ is better.

I didn't mean to say that, sorry if I gave the wrong impression. I
simply meant to say that _if_ there are certain design decisions which
can be made such that interfacing with other languages becomes easier,
it is worth doing that.

I'd be perfectly happy with a Python-only version already.

Cheers,
Kasper

You're right. I've misunderstood your message.

Christophe

Kasper Peeters a écrit :

···

If it becomes easy to have formulas with Python then it would be used. That's sure. You can't say that C++ is better.
    
I didn't mean to say that, sorry if I gave the wrong impression. I
simply meant to say that _if_ there are certain design decisions which
can be made such that interfacing with other languages becomes easier,
it is worth doing that.

I'd be perfectly happy with a Python-only version already.

Cheers,
Kasper

Hi all,

Freddie Witherden wrote:

However, my primary focus will be on Cairo and Qt backends. These are widely used, allow for high quality output in various formats (PDF, PNG and SVG being the big three) and are well tested.

It would also be great to pull in the pure-Python PDF and SVG code from matplotlib so that no C GUI libraries would be required.

I agree, long term it would be good to have these available.

The lack of a C++/C library should not be a major issue. Python is very well established in the fields that the library is likely to be of most use (web, graphing, visualisation) and where it isn't there will most certainly be a command-line too.

On that note it is probably possible to write C++ library around the eventual Python API. Of course it will take a bit of work (and require a Python interpreter to linger) and it is not something I can claim much experience in -- but I can not see any reason why it would not be feasible.

Regards, Freddie.

PGP.sig (194 Bytes)

···

On 27 Apr 2009, at 15:33, Michael Droettboom wrote:

Hi all,

For those that are interested I have finally (now that my first batch of exams are finished) set-up a blog so that you can track the progress of the project.

My blog can be found here: http://gsoc-mathtex.blogspot.com/ (no marks for originality ;). I intend to update it on a semi-regular basis, time permitting.

Regards, Freddie.

PGP.sig (194 Bytes)

Freddie Witherden a écrit :

Hi all,

For those that are interested I have finally (now that my first batch of exams are finished) set-up a blog so that you can track the progress of the project.

My blog can be found here: http://gsoc-mathtex.blogspot.com/ (no marks for originality ;). I intend to update it on a semi-regular basis, time permitting.

Regards, Freddie.
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That's very cool. I'm very impatient to test it...

Christophe.