ANN: matplotlib-0.87.4 (bugfix release for enthon)

To reply more directly to your proposal now that I have

    > thought about it more: although I see the logic in it, I
    > don't see much gain from your Nx2 idea; it not very hard to
    > simply write P.plot(z[:,0], z[:,1]). Furthermore,

And with the new .T attribute in numpy, you can do

  from numpy import rand
  X = rand(20,2)
  plot(*X.T)

JDH

Except that rand is no longer in the numpy namespace :slight_smile:

One reason why I don't like this syntax is that you can't use further
arguments or keywords easily:

def foo(a,b,c,keyw="asd"): print a,b,c,keyw
x = ['1','2','3]
foo(*x) # works fine
foo(*x,"123") # breaks
foo(*x,keyw="123") # breaks
foo(*x,**{'keyw'="123"}) # works

But I guess you can always plot first and adjust parameters later.

Cheers
Stéfan

···

On Thu, Jul 13, 2006 at 07:45:37AM -0500, John Hunter wrote:

    > To reply more directly to your proposal now that I have
    > thought about it more: although I see the logic in it, I
    > don't see much gain from your Nx2 idea; it not very hard to
    > simply write P.plot(z[:,0], z[:,1]). Furthermore,

And with the new .T attribute in numpy, you can do

  from numpy import rand
  X = rand(20,2)
  plot(*X.T)

That has become:
from numpy.random import rand

Cheers,
Alan Isaac

···

On Thu, 13 Jul 2006, John Hunter apparently wrote:

  from numpy import rand